Name: Janice I. Levet
City: Pollock Pines
State: California
Country: United States of America
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Nationality: United States of America
Occupation: High School Instructor of Spanish
Birthday: April 27, 1951
Age: 52
T-Shirt: Medium
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Number of Years Running: 25
Number of Marathons and 50k's: 107

Distances:

Qualifying Standard(s) I Meet-#1: A)Autumn Leaves 50-mi. (OR), 1991, 7:40:20, 3rd (1st, age group)
B)Ruth Anderson 100K (CA): 50-mi. split, 1992, 7:31:10, 1st woman
C)Silver State 50-mi. (NV), 2000, 11:31:34, 2nd (1st, age group)
D)Run on the Sly 50-mi. (CA), 2000, 9:46:26, 7th

#2 A)Western States 100-mi. Endurance Run (CA), 1985, 23:38:51, 8th
B)Western States 100-mi. Endurance Run (cA), 2000, 27:01, 14th

#4 A)See #1 above for 50-milers)
B)Related endurance field: since 1970 extensive experience long-distance solo backpacking, including a
solo through-hike of the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada between 1980 and 1983 at distances of
approximately 700 miles each summer

#5 A)(See #1 above for 50-milers)
B)Veteran, Badwater Heat Training Clinic, 2002: Partial Day One, Complete Day Two, and solo climb of
Telescope Peak Day Three
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50 mile races-American River, 1982, CA, 50-mi., 9:45:37
Pacific Crest Trail, 1983, CA, 50-mi., 9:35
American River, 1983, CA, 50-mi., 9:08
Four Peaks, 1984, AZ, 50-mi., 9:48, 1st woman, course record
American River, 1984, CA, 50-mi., 8:25:50
Nugget, 1984, CA, 50-mi., 9:28:09
Drake's Bay, 1984, CA, 50-mi., 8:40, 1st in age group
Avalon Benefit, 1985, CA, 50-mi., 7:56, 1st woman
American River, 1985, CA, 50-mi., 7:46:56
Cal 50, 1985, CA, 50-mi., 8:06
Nugget, 1985, CA, 50-mi., 8:45, 1st woman, course record
Avalon Benefit, 1986, CA, 50-mi., 8:37
American River, 1986, CA, 50-mi., 8:03, 1st woman
Nugget, 1986, CA, 50-mi., 8:57
American River, 1986, CA, 50-mi., 7:50, 1st in age group
Nugget, 1987, CA, 50-mi., 8:34
Autumn Leaves, 1991, OR, 50-mi., 7:40:20, 1st in age group
Ledson Marsh, 1992, CA, 50-mi., 8:02:58, 1st in age group
Nugget, 1992, CA, 50-mi., 8:34:10, 1st in age group
Firetrails, 1992, CA, 50-mi., 8:56:40, 1st woman
Finnon Lake, 1992, CA, 50-mi., 7:57:13, 1st woman, course record
American River, 1993, CA, 50-mi., 8:03, 1st in age group
Nugget, 1993, CA, 50-mi., 8:45
Firetrails, 1993, CA, 50-mi., 10:15
Last Chance, 1994, CA, 50-mi., 7:58:37, 1st woman
Nugget, 1995, CA, 50-mi., 9:50
Pony Express, 1995, CA, 50-mi., 9:09, 1st in age group
American River, 1996, CA, 50-mi., 8:23:33
Silver State, 1996, NV, 50-mi., 12:34:04
Pony Express, 1996, CA, 50-mi., 8:25:25
Run on the Sly, 1996, CA, 50-mi., 9:18:21
Jed Smith, 1997, 50-mi., 7:43;59, 1st woman
American River, 1997, CA, 50-mi., 8:23:07, 1st in age group
Leona Divide, 1997, CA, 50-mi., 9:18, 1st in age group
Winterhawk Semler, 1997, OR, 50-mi., 8:47:39
Helen Klein, 1997, CA, USATF National Road Championship, 50-mi., 8:07, 1st in age group
Jed Smith, 1998, CA, 50-mi., 8:42:48
American River, 1998, CA, 50-mi., 9:42:21
Quicksilver, 1998, CA, 50-mi., 9:49
Jed Smith, 1999, CA, 50-mi., 8:00:28
American River, 1999, CA, 50-mi., 8:57
Silver State, 1999, NV, 50-mi., 11:27:08, 1st in age group
Run on the Sly, 1999, CA, 50-mi., 9:06
American river, 2000, CA, 9:21:57
Silver State, 2000, NV, 11:31:34, 1st in age group
Run on the Sly, 2000, CA 9:46:26
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100km races-Steamroller, 1985, CA, 100K, 12:24, 1st woman
Ruth Anderson, 1992, CA, 100K, 9:29:39, 1st woman
Helen Klein, 1995, CA, USATF National Championship, 100K, 10:11:45, 3rd in age group
What, Mi-wok?, 1997, CA, 100K, 13:03
What, Mi-wok?, 1999, CA, 100K, 12:22
What, Mi-wok?, 2000, CA, 100K, 12:52:44
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100mi races-Western States 100-mile Endurance Run, CA, 1985, 23:38:51, 8th
Western States 100-mile Endurance Run, CA, 1986, 25:27
Western States 100-mile Endurance Run, CA, 1993, 28:26:18
Vermont 100-mile Endurance Run, VT, 1996, 22:55:55, 1st in age group
Kettle Moraine, 100-mile Endurance Run, WS, 1998, 24:52:26
Western States 100-mile Endurance Run, CA, 1999, 27:28
Western States 100-mile Endurance Run, CA, 2000, 27:01
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100mi+ races-USATF National Championship 24-hour, CA, 1992, 116 miles, 4th woman, 2nd in age group
Gibson Ranch 48-hour, CA, 1995, 146.5 miles, 1st woman
USATF National Championship 24-hour, OH, 1999, 115.4667 miles, 3rd woman, 2nd in age group

Previous Badwater Racing Experience: None
Previous Badwater Crewing Experience: Crew/Pacer in 2002 for Barbara Elia: Crewed from the start at Badwater to just short of Lone Pine, and accompanied her, running, for about 40 miles. What did I learn? As a runner: drink, drink, drink; keep yourself wet, wet, wet; continue moving forward, forward, forward (heck, you can even throw up and still keep on walking, right?); and believe in yourself: there's always more left in your body than your brain's telling you. Be kind to your crew, and trust that your crew people are familiar with their individual duties in order to fulfill your needs. Organize, organize, organize crew vehicles for ease and simplicity's sake. Be sure your crew secures for you that hamburger, fries, and a shake just before you get to Lone Pine. KEEP IT FUN FOR ALL PARTIES INVOLVED IN THE ADVENTURE!
Previous Badwater Clinic Experience: 2002 joining Barbara Elia at the Clinic: Day One I ran from Stovepipe Wells Backwards on the course to meet Barb, and then ran in with her (maybe a total of five miles or so: wimpy); Day Two I ran the entire stretch from Stovepipe Wells to Panamint Springs; Day Three I solo ran/hiked up to Telescope Peak. What I learned? There's not a whole lot of shoulder along Death Valley roads for running! Yikes! Watch oncoming/and behind-you traffic! Drink, drink, and drink some more. Monitor your body's electrolyte balance: bloody pee I can't imagine would be any fun. Run YOUR pace and not that of the hot shots in front of you. And I'll never again take my vehicle up that dreadful "road" to the Telescope Peak trailhead.
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My Badwater Finishing Prediction:

Between 40 and 50 hours, supported by my history of consistent forward motion; mind games I play to keep myself moving, moving, moving; telling myself there's always more left in my body than what my brain's telling me at any given moment (If there ain't no bone showin', then keep on goin'!); perusing times of previous Badwater finishers in the 40-50-hour range in light of their beforehand preparation and performances within the venues of 100-mile and 24-hour events, and comparing said performances with my own running history. My qualifying event times rank as high or higher than 40-50-hour previous Badwater finishers. I'm not going to say, 'though, under 40 hours for myself! That would be icing. Badwater's definitely a different animal than any other in which I've participated.
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My Weirdest Experience:

Other than the usual skunk, coyote, fox, bobcat and bear sightings, mostly along the Western States Trail; and taking a couple of wrong turns in trail events (Drake's Bay and Nugget) (Hey, I saw NO markings whatsoever!), my first weird moment came during the later night stages of my first 48-hour run at Gibson Ranch (CA) in 1995. The fence posts which were supposed to all be in a line following the start/finish of the loop, were no longer there. I could perceive the ropes strung from supposed post to supposed post, but couldn't make out any real posts: just ropes hanging at horizontal intervals in space... Okay, and then training with my cousin Nancy March for Western States a few years back on a night run along the Trail between Green Gate and Auburn Lake Trails, we spy two bright, piercing yellow eyes a short ways down and off to the left of the trail. Halting in our tracks, reaching down for rocks to throw at whatever creature it was, the eyes don't waver for a second. We approach, and the eyes remain fixed on us. Pondering whether to abandon the run and turn around and go back to her house, or meet the challenge head-on, we choose the latter. Closer, closer...and said "eyes" turn out to be two reflectors on a Western States Trail mileage post, reflecting back to us our own flashlights' light. The rest of the run to Placer High was punctuated with uncontrollable laughter whenever we saw the next glowing set of eyes down the trail. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
My Most Challenging Race Experience:

Each of my 124 ultras has presented me with its own singular challenge to meet. My first Western States in 1985 found me between between Green Gate and Auburn Lake Trails suffering from dehydration. Never having experienced such discomfort before, I found myself reduced to a shuffle, punctuated by six continuous miles of vomiting and diarrhea. Regrouping at ALT for 45 minutes and downing copious amounts of bullion (nasty stuff), allowed me to get it together and challenge myself to keep eyes focused on the finish at Placer High. I buckled under 24 hours. A second quite difficult event, for which I doubt I adequately prepared, was the Gibson Ranch 48-hour event in 1995. Forcing myself to stay on my feet for that long -- weaving back and forth in the dark from lack of sleep, feeling the effects of having tried new foods on race day (stupid), to follow through with my commitment to finish the event supremely tested my mental resolve and discipline. I finished 1st woman with 146.5 miles.
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WhyI Run Ultras:

Being somewhat of a loner-type, I enjoy the solitude of the sport and the opportunity the training and the events themselves offer to seek an inner strength and personal satisfaction which our currently fabricated lifestyle fails to present to us. Ultras require an unshakable self-discipline, paired with physical and mental training in learning to face and deal with the unpredictable. Ultras give me a simplicity and serenity within myself, and the opportunity to look further inward for a sense of exploration, discovery and personal satisfaction that no societally-fabricated job with its confining walls, Sunflex miniblinds, and work-related administrivia has ever given me, nor ever will.
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Why I want a slot on the start line of the 2003 Badwater Ultramarathon:

The Badwater Ultramarathon will take me down a new path in stretching myself, taking a different risk than most of those I've encountered during my 22-year longevity of ultras. With risk-taking we can grow through the process of being uncertain of the outcome of heading down that open road. Badwater will offer me up a plate of numerous risks, some new to me -- the heat, the potential foot problems, the challenges of staying hydrated and well-fueled, the continual mind-numbing pavement -- , which I'll openly embrace to stretch myself beyond the comfortable envelope in which we find ourselves, to seek out the frontier of my spirit. Helen Keller said, "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure." If I don't push myself to meet a goal, then years down the road I'll find myself regretting that I never tried.
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My Other Ultrasport Experience:

1978: Member of the American Women's Himalayan Expedition to Nepal to put the first all-women team on the summit of an 8000-meter peak (Annapurna). Lacking technical climbing expertise, I provided assistance through a 200+-mile trekking traverse around the Annapurna massif.

1980-1983: I solo through-hiked the 2800-miles of the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada, covering about 700 miles during each of four summers.

2001: I adventure-ran a 150-mile circuit through the Cordilleras Blanca and Huayhuash of the Peruvian Andes, and finished up with a one-day run of the 50K Inca Trail from Chilca to Machu Picchu.
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Media that I will represent or write for:

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Media that will cover my experience in this race:

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The Charity that I will represent and raise funds for is: